Competitive Program #5

 
 
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Driver / Predator

by Gerald Habarth

Driver / Predator is an experimental animation inspired by a weekly, three-hundred mile commute and the mental wanderings that accompany it. It tells a meandering
story of a character suspended between spaces, and immersed in reflection and dreams of travel, work, war, and isolation. Amid his travels, he is visited by a menacing predator, the product of his own creation. Made from thousands of photographs and videos taken en route, and combining various animating techniques, including cutout, rotoscoping, stop-motion, time-lapse, and 3D digital animation, this work reflects on issues of virtuality, dislocation, self-destruction, and the difficulty of defining self in a technologically saturated culture.

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Debris

by Giuseppe Boccassini

"Debris" is a travelogue of a shipwreck which tries, through decomposed memories, to grab onto new flesh.

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Maelstroms

by Lana Caplan

Using animation, heat sensitive camera footage from US border patrol screens, military bombing drone monitors, and other collected footage, Maelstroms is a reflection on the dehumanizing use of image technology by land, air and sea.

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Circles of Confusion

by Jason Britski

“Circles of Confusion” is a formal experiment that combines underwater photography and archival “home movie” footage. The images are manipulated, superimposed, and degraded digitally in order to reveal the beauty and the danger hovering at their margins.

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Grey Water/Black Water

by Josh Drake

A film about my anxieties on being a homeowner, having a family, and maintaining a septic system.

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In Search of Martin Klein

by Joseph Wilcox

I discovered Martin Klein while browsing a conspiracy web forum a few years back. He caught my attention with a series of posts he made with ideas I had not seen anywhere else; most notably a video explaining how the CIA had infiltrated the punk scene in the 80s. In an abrupt final post, he included a cryptic letter that he received from a company called True Picture America. I’ve come to the conclusion that this letter was a warning. The film serves as evidence from my path of discovery into who Martin Klein was and who he was not.